(KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov


  • Paperback
  • 385
  • Lectures on Literature
  • Vladimir Nabokov
  • English
  • 07 September 2019
  • 9780156027755

Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary

Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary Lectures on Literature characters ß 108 Great fiction Here collected for the first time are his famous lectures which include Mansfield Park Bleak. Ok so first thing the lecture on Ulysses in here is the best of the bunch and a must for anyone who wants to read that novel but is intimidated by its alleged impenetrability I ll argue to my death that Ulysses isn t really that hard as long as you apply yourself and it s way worth the effort but I will admit it can be a bit tough to follow without the proper grounding I think the main trick is to read a summary of each chapter BEFORE you read that chapter and then you ll be able to easily pick up what s going on N does just that And not only does he offer neat summaries he calls attention to lots of the small neat details that provide a good chunk of the novel s joy N has clearly read Ulysses dozens of times he s picked up on all of the subtle little coincidences and themes and chains of events that line the novel and he imparts this wisdom to the first time readerAnd that s really the core of all of these lectures N believed that great novels should be read many times and only on repeat readings do you pick up on the little things that provide the type of joy that he feels is the true purpose of literature These lectures provide examples of these and in turn helps teach the reader how to look for them how to admire the the skill that goes into creating a great work and how to read on a deeper careful level than we re used toAnd while the lectures are generally pretty fun to read the real utility of this book doesn t come from the actual experience of reading it but rather from noticing how the points N harps on have invaded your mind and changed the way you look at art in general Le Comte de Monte Cristo of the bunch and a must for anyone who wants to read that novel but is intimidated by its alleged impenetrability I ll argue to my death that Ulysses isn t really that hard as long as you apply yourself and it s way worth the effort but I will admit it can be a bit tough to follow without the proper grounding I think the main trick is to read a summary Necessary Women and The Mean Time of each chapter BEFORE you read that chapter and then you ll be able to easily pick up what s going Divorce and Remarriage A Redemptive Theology on N does just that And not 5 Elementos only does he The Dying Game offer neat summaries he calls attention to lots Contemporary Japanese Architects Big of the small neat details that provide a good chunk Nus féminins : Modèles d'atelier pour l'artiste of the novel s joy N has clearly read Ulysses dozens Collision With the Infinite A Life Beyond the Personal Self of times he s picked up Reality Lesbian on all A Bride for Eight Brothers 1 Mikayla's Men of the subtle little coincidences and themes and chains The Marcher Lords Their Treacheries and Troubles in Wales of events that line the novel and he imparts this wisdom to the first time readerAnd that s really the core Musicophilia Tales of Music and the Brain of all Anti Racist Social Work of these lectures N believed that great novels should be read many times and Martyrdom in the Sikh Tradition only Metaltown on repeat readings do you pick up Laughter, The Best Malaysian on the little things that provide the type Esther of joy that he feels is the true purpose Golden the Ship Was Oh Oh Oh of literature These lectures provide examples A Togahans Tale (Togahan, #1) of these and in turn helps teach the reader how to look for them how to admire the the skill that goes into creating a great work and how to read Famille zéro déchet, Ze guide on a deeper careful level than we re used toAnd while the lectures are generally pretty fun to read the real utility Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints Alcohol Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints of this book doesn t come from the actual experience The Boy in the Band The Boy in the Band #1 of reading it but rather from noticing how the points N harps Trouble in Paradise on have invaded your mind and changed the way you look at art in general

characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov

Lectures on Literature

Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary Lectures on Literature characters ß 108 House and Ulysses Edited and with a Foreword by Fredson Bowers; Introduction by John Updike; illustrations. Some time back I reviewed Crime and Punishment for One of the commentators on my review suggested that I take a look at Vladimir Nabokov s critical analysis of Dostoevsky So via I purchased Vladimir Nabokov s book Lectures in Literature As luck would have it this was not the volume covering Dostoevsky The end result A greater appreciation for Nabokov and also a sense that I m not apt to invest a great deal of time reading other of his literary analysis The essays in this book represent lectures that he gave at Wellesley College and Cornell University John Updike s Introduction provides some context for this work He notes that Nabokov s lectures provide Page xxv a dazzling demonstration for those lucky Cornell students in the remote clean cut fifties of the irresistible artistic sensibility He also notes in Nabokov s words the truth of novels that Pages xxv xxvi great novels are great fairy tales and the novels in this series are supreme fairy tales Nabokov himself points out that a writer can be considered as a a storyteller b a teacher and c an enchanter Page 5 And above all he values style and structure in authors creations Maybe a couple examples will illustrate his critical approach First Jane Austen s Mansfield Park Nabokov is very pleased with her work Given his emphasis on style and structure he details how well she constructs this work For instance at one point the characters among whom there are a variety of tensions to begin with select a play to perform The decision as to which of the characters in Austen s story would play which characters in the play is well discussed by Nabokov The play itself raises uestions it was in fact an actual play that scandalized some of the characters in the novel And it exacerbated pre existing tensions among the characters All in all Nabokov makes a great case that Austen s structure of this segment of the novel was well done indeed And in terms of style he says of Austen that Page 59 she handles it with perfection Nabokov convinced me that Austen was a terrific technical writer who wed her genius to techniue and style and structure to create something special Another example Kafka s Metamorphosis a story I read several decades ago I recall the sense of despair I felt reading about the travails of Gregor Samsa and a sense that despite the awfuloffal nature of the work that there was something important here Nabokov is very positive about this piece Much of this lecture is a simple description of the work scene by scene and Nabokov spennds some time noting how Kafka s work is so much better than Stevenson s work discussed above Samsa s unexplained transformation into a beetle is the event that triggers this story Nabokov notes how this tragedy has positive elements a family finally getting its act together even as it abandons Gregor and illustrates Kafka s style Of the latter Nabokov says Page 283 You will mark Kafka s style Its clarity its precise and formal intonation in such striking contrast to the nightmare matter of his story I admire his emphasis on style and structure but I also think there is an almost sanitary uality about some of his observations But I m a political scientist not a literary critic Overll this is an intellectually exciting book as one learns how a literary critic from one critical perspective examining a series of works Austen Dickens Flaubert Stevenson Proust Kafka and Joyce If interested in Nabokov s critical perspective this is a good starting point

Read & Download Lectures on Literature

Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary Lectures on Literature characters ß 108 For two decades first at Wellesley and then at Cornell Nabokov introduced undergraduates to the delights of. A writer might be a good storyteller or a good moralist but unless he be an enchanter an artist he is not a great writer I have always wanted to know Nabokov the reader who hates allegories say Animal Farm novels where characters act are just what mouth pieces for different kind of opinions Magic Mountain not a fan either moral tales can t agree allusions to other works and signs and symbolisms unless they are directly related not a fan either sentimental readings chick lit romances and finds detective novels boring because of their poor proseOn AllegoriesIt is his dislike of allegories including those like Animal Farm which shocked me I can see why it might be annoying when critics or readers are matching the elements in the allegories to real world but best of allegories can stand on their even if you didn t know the real world parallels which they originally used as supporting structures Even people who know nothing about Russian revolution can enjoy Animal farm while people knowing nothing about Odyssey can enjoy Ulysses Rushdi s works which began like Allegories are often capable of losing themselves to natural growth of their chracters Nabokov himself argues that Dr Jeckyll and Hyde a minor classic according to Nabokov is not an allegory I agree and would have failed if it was one According to him same goes for Kafka s Metamorphosis don t agree Nabokov s SpineThe thing is he frowns upon readers who read to gain knowledge I do that orand sentimental pleasureI do that too So what kind of satisfaction he seeks from reading It seems to me that a good formula to test the uality of a novel is in the long run a merging of the precision of poetry and the intuition of science In order to bask in that magic a wise reader reads the book of genius not with his heart not so much with his brain but with his spine It is there that occurs the telltale tingle even though we must keep a little aloof a little detached when reading Then with a pleasure which is both sensual and intellectual we shall watch the artist build his castle of cards and watch the castle of cards become a castle of beautiful steel and glass And thus a Tolstoy Anna Karenina gets repeated allusions even though he wasn t teaching it or a Dickens Bleak House are kind of authors he admires because of their ability to carry on several chains of a lot of characters and themes at the same time And if the author is able to bring these chains of stories to a satisfactory end the author is a genius According to him the correct way to reading Metamorphosis is by looking at how Kafka maintains a balance between Gregor s insect and human behavior This love for juggling several characters themes and stories need notonly be fr novel as whole though it can be shown in a single scene with lots of characters and story threads going at same time examples being agricultural fair scene from Madame Bovary Llosa also admired that scene and the chapter 10 one with several vignettes and characters of Ulysses with first getting a much higher praise from NabokovTo be honest I think this whole juggling thing is a technical aspect which can only fascinate a writer who is trying to achieve something similar A common reader won t have a spine sensitive to the perfection of art and is likely to love characters from Dostoevsky s imperfect scenes who provide emotional and intellectual food Nabokov thinks of such readers as bad readers but in this he sounds very snobbish to meOn ProseNow some things we do agree onNabokov also wants you to pay attention to details He is someone who actually drew a sketch of bug Samsa turned into he was really knowledgeable about insects and bugs as well as the design of his house as well as twin houses of Dr Jekyll and Hyde He wants authors to focus on all corners and triffle spots and work them into perfect prose there should be no weak sentences or Devil forbid passages Some readers may suppose that such things as these evocations are trifles not worth stopping at but literature consists of such trifles Literature consists in fact not of general ideas but of particular revelations not of schools of thought but of individuals of genius Literature is not about something it is the thing itself the uiddity Without the masterpiece literature does not exist He uses graphs to show Jekyll wasn t a perfectly good person He goes into depths of how those two last got their names He can uote the lectures are 70% uotes whole passages sometimes whole pages And not uotes that stand out for themselves but descriptions descriptions like those describing Jekyll turning into Hyde That is what he wants you to work on as an author on prose to keep on writing it and rewriting it until everything is perfect If you ask him when it comes to descriptions no one beats Flaubert with his Madame Bovary which Im willing to bet is Nabhokov s favorite book along with another book on famous cheating wife of literature Anna Karenina and Proust with his Remembrance of things Past the greatest novel of the first half of our century though he only discusses Swann s Way On character aspects and sketchesNabokov wants you to keep a distance from characters and so there is not a lot of time spent analyzing them though few insights he does give are brilliant His analysis of Emma Bovary s is disagreeable to me but would be agreeable to Flaubert Same with psychology he cracks a lot of jokes at expense of Freud that medieval uack He doesn t spend much time commenting on the sensitivity of Proust s protagonist either who and Freud unknowingly reflected much on each other s worksHe loves Joyce s work too but is not particularly impressed by Joyce s Incomplete rapid broken wording rendering the so called stream of consciousness or better say the stepping stones of consciousness giving reasons like First the device is not realistic or scientific than any other In fact if some of Molly s thoughts were described instead of all of them being recorded their expression would strike one as realistic natural The point is that the stream of consciousness is a stylistic convention because obviously we do not think continuously in words we think also in images but the switch from words to images can be recorded in direct words only if description is eliminated as it is here Another thing some of our reflections come and go others stay they stop as it were amorphous and sluggish and it takes some time for the flowing thoughts and thoughtlets to run around those rocks of thought The drawback of simulating a recording of thought is the blurring of the time element and too great a reliance on typography I agree and I agree again when he says that Molly s thoughts in last chapters of Ulysses would read just as good as they do now if Joyce s editor had introduced punctuation marks in those run on sentences Although I wonder what he would have said about Woolf s Mrs Dalloway in which thoughts are described instead of being recorded as Nabokov would prefer them The only female author that is included is Jane Austen with her Mansfield Park towards whom Nabokov takes a patronizing attitude as if to a younger artist And oh while we are on Joyce he declares Finnegans Wake to be one of the greatest failures in literatureOn Reality Literature was not born the day when a boy crying wolf wolf came running out of the Neanderthal valley with a big gray wolf at his heels literature was born on the day when a boy came crying wolf wolf and there was no wolf behind him My best take from the book is his ideas on the use of words like realism and naturalism in criticism He doesn t understand the habit of dividing books into fantasies or realist ones according to him all novels including those like The Trial The Overcoat and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde are realist as well as fantasiesA very long uote must be impact of Nabhokov s company in spoiler about how Nabokov understands novelist s reality view spoiler Let us take three types of men walking through the same landscape Number One is a city man on a well deserved vacation Number Two is a professional botanist Number Three is a local farmer Number One the city man is what is called a realistic commonsensical matter of fact type he sees trees as trees and knows from his map that the road he is following is a nice new road leading to Newton where there is a nice eating place recommended to him by a friend in his office The botanist looks around and sees his environment in the very exact terms of plant life precise biological and classified units such as specific trees and grasses flowers and ferns and for him this is reality to him the world of the stolid tourist who cannot distinguish an oak from an elm seems a fantastic vague dreamy never never world Finally the world of the local farmer differs from the two others in that his world is intensely emotional and personal since he has been born and bred there and knows every trail and individual tree and every shadow from every tree across every trail all in warm connection with his everyday work and his childhood and a thousand small things and patterns which the other two the humdrum tourist and the botanical taxonomist simply cannot know in the given place at the given time Our farmer will not know the relation of the surrounding vegetation to a botanical conception of the world and the botanist will know nothing of any importance to him about that barn or that old field or that old house under its cottonwoods which are afloat as it were in a medium of personal memories for one who was born thereSo here we have three different worlds three men ordinary men who have different realities and of course we could bring in a number of other beings a blind man with a dog a hunter with a dog a dog with his man a pamter cruising in uest of a sunset a girl out of gas In every case it would be a world completely different from the rest since the most objective words tree road flower sky barn thumb rain have in each totally different subjective connotations Indeed this subjective life is so strong that it makes an empty and broken shell of the so called objective existence The only way back to objective reality is the following one we can take these several individual worlds mix them thoroughly together scoop up a drop of that mixture and call it objective reality We may taste in it a particle of madness if a lunatic passed through that locality or a particle of complete and beautiful nonsense if a man has been looking at a lovely field and imagining upon it a lovely factory producing buttons or bombs but on the whole these mad particles would be diluted in the drop of objective reality that we hold up to the light in our test tube Moreover this objective reality will contain something that transcends optical illusions and laboratory tests It will have elements of poetry of lofty emotion of energy and endeavor and even here the button king may find his rightful place of pity pride passion and the craving for a thick steak at the recommended roadside eating placeSo when we say reality we are really thinking of all this in one drop an average sample of a mixture of a million individual realities And it is in this sense of human reality that I use the term reality when placing it against a backdrop such as the worlds of The Carrick Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and The Metamorphosis which are specific fantasies hide spoiler


10 thoughts on “(KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov

  1. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary At first I was wary of this book being a former grad student and current exile from the literary academy with no interest in rejoining those stale debates But what a breath of fresh air it proved to be Nabokov was not surprisingly a keen reader and he brings all his technical prowess to bear on works from Dickens Austen Flaubert and

  2. says: Read & Download Lectures on Literature (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov “A writer might be a good storyteller or a good moralist but unless he be an enchanter an artist he is not a great writer” I have always wanted to know Nabokov the reader – who hates allegories say Animal Farm novels where characters a

  3. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov This took me several years to read and I was very pleased with the way my approach to the lectures worked out Having listene

  4. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov

    characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov If you love classic literature there is much to be enjoyed in Nabokov's lectures This volume covers seven novels Mansfield Park Bleak House The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde The Walk by Swann's Place aka Swann's Way The Metamorphosis Kafka and Ulysses In each case Nabokov's erudition and unapologetic perspectives offer the reader a way to dig deeper into these classics Time permitting I'm looking for

  5. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Ok so first thing the lecture on Ulysses in here is the best of the bunch and a must for anyone who wants to read that novel but is intimidated

  6. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Nabokov wasn't just a brilliant and playful writer he was also an excellent reader even in a language which he pr

  7. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov

    Read & Download Lectures on Literature (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary for a split second this made me nostalgic for college then i recovered my senses

  8. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary

    (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Some time back I reviewed Crime and Punishment for One of the commentators on my review suggested that I take a look at Vladimir Nabokov's critical analysis of Dostoevsky So via I purchased Vladimir Nabokov's book Lectures in Literature As luck would have it this was not the volume covering Dostoevsky The end

  9. says: Read & Download Lectures on Literature (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary

    Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov Read & Download Lectures on Literature The isms go; the ist dies; art remainsThe above is uoted directly from this book and in particular is a comment made in reference by Nabokov on Flaubert's Madam BovaryThis expresses a thought I have had for decades but lack Nabokov's brilliance elouenceThe scattered gems that sparkle throughout this book are what kept me readingA

  10. says: (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov ↠ 8 Summary characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov

    characters â eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Vladimir Nabokov (KINDLE) Lectures on Literature BY Vladimir Nabokov I've read his lecture on 'Du côté de chez Swann' and the section on being a 'good reader' with which I already was familiar I'll read the lecture on 'Ulysses' nextIf you are reading or have read any of the novels discussed you may

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